Tag Archives: Tbilisi

Visa advice for the hapless and hopeless romantic who insists on travelling overland from Georgia to China

VISA ADVICE FOR THE HAPLESS AND HOPELESS ROMANTIC WHO INSISTS ON TRAVELLING OVERLAND FROM GEORGIA TO CHINA

Acquiring a visa for Kazakhstan in Tbilisi 

Cost: US$45 in cash

Type of visa: 30-day tourist

Length of wait: Five days

Ease: Fairly straightforward

Note: Biggest bumma about applying for a Kazakhstan visa in Tbilisi is that the Kazakhstan consulate is at the top of a really big hill. I mean really big! You can catch bus number 66 from the main bus station on Chavchavadze street and it will drop you directly out front of the gate, which is handy. Otherwise, you could grab a taxi or stretch your legs. There were very few people applying for visas, therefore the service was fast. No unruly queue.

As well as submitting our application form we submitted a copy of a hotel booking and a cover letter – the latter was unnecessary. Note that the consular services are NO LONGER on Orbeliani Street. You need to go to 23 Shatberashvili  – the security guard will show you what to do in order to be seen. BE AWARE THAT THE VISA STARTS TICKING FROM THE DATE YOU SPECIFY ENTRY ON YOUR APPLICATION. WE DID OUR CALCULATIONS WRONG AND ENDED UP LOSING HALF OUR TIME IN KAZAKHSTAN BY STAYING OVERLY LONG IN GEORGIA. Continue reading

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Breaking crust

The farmhouse, Momavlis Mitsa

Saturday morning in Argokhi. There is work to be done: water butts to fill; pigs to feed; floors to sweep; tea to brew – but there’s no hurry. I sit on the steps cracking hazelnuts, listening to the sounds passing up and down the lane on the opposite side of the above-head-high metal fence. I hear ducks squawking, the lazy turning of cartwheels, neighbours fussing, the crank of the timber grape press, and the occasional sound of apples falling from the tree. It’s mid-autumn. Every warm day between now and Christmas is worth its weight in gold.

Working on Momavlis Mitsa (Future Earth) farm in Argokhi has ameliorated the discomfort of waiting for visas in Tbilisi. Instead of sitting like ghosts in some disembodying hostel, milking the wifi and kicking stones down Marjainishvili on the way to the Metro, we’re working outdoors, using our lungs and hands to lift things, fix things, bake things, grow things.

Creating new raised beds

Richie and Sam adding rotted compost to the soil

In the garden we’re asked to do things we’d never do at home, in our own garden: pull weeds, hoe earth, turn soil, plant monocultures and raise new beds without mulching them. I bite my lip as Inken, the 18-year-old longterm German volunteer, instructs me on how to break the ‘crust’ that has formed on the surface of the soil due to successive phases of watering and sunshine. We work the hoe forward while simultaneously walking backwards down the aisles. I wonder if I’m disturbing the roots of the small plants, and why there are no bugs or worms in the soil.

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Georgia on my mind…

In the capital of Georgia, Tbilisi, you can still find homes arrayed around large central courtyards set-back from the road. As many as six or seven families share these communal courtyards: coming and going at all hours of day or night… washing hanging, children playing, and the scent of cooking wafting through windows. Everyone’s business is everyone else’s business because everything here is open and transparent. A lot of yelling goes on, and a lot of retaliation.

Three generations of women reside in the house where we’re staying. One of them speaks English. There’s a dog too. His name is Pushkin. We’ve become used to nosing through the womens’ quarters on our way to and from the bathroom. We’ve grottied the courtyard table more than once with watermelon juice. It’s nice to know that when we tire of the cramped conditions inside the house we can step outside for a breather, airing our stained towels on the outside line and waiting under the poplar tree for our Russian and Kazahk visas to mature. We wish Sam would put his shoes out once in awhile!

A Tbilisi courtyard – homestay.

Tbilisi is a pleasant place to be waylaid. It’s the bottle-neck through which we hope to pass into the wilds of Russia, Kazahkstan and, eventually, China.  It’s not a simple or a speedy process but as our Syrian roommate pointed out to us, we’re extremely lucky that if we follow procedure by filling out the relevant forms and providing the stipulated amount of money, we can travel more or less unimpeded through any territory on the planet. The apple forests of the Tien Shan Mountains still feel a long way off, but the breeze is blowing from that direction.  Continue reading

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