Tag Archives: Permatravel

Home & Away Part 1

Is it me, or are the desire to travel and the desire to garden at odds?

The reason I ask is that I find myself faced with the quandary of wanting to travel and wanting to settle (literally cultivate a home and garden).

Inside me, the hunter/gather and farmer/settler archetypes coexist in uneasy, sometimes antagonistic relation.

Me: the muddy boots of a permie (permaculture gardener) and the worn backpack of a bona-fide traveller. Eeck. A walking contradiction?

Me: the muddy boots of a permie (permaculture gardener) and the worn backpack of a bona-fide traveller. Eeck. A walking contradiction?

Not an ideal scenario, right?

Over the past few years I’ve attempted (with varying degrees of success) to harmonise my desire to travel with my desire to garden: I’ve gardened whilst dreaming of travel, and have even gardened whilst travelling, albeit in other peoples’ gardens (if the latter appeals to you I suggest you look into becoming a WWOOFer – a Willing Worker on Organic Farms).

Me WWOOFing in Central Italy - labors spent in service of anthers' garden

Me WWOOFing in Central Italy – labours spent in service of anothers’ garden

Although my heady months of WWOOFing during my overland odyssey from England to Australia in 2012-2013 were extraordinary and deeply rewarding, there was something that dissatisfied me, generally, about my experience:

I never stuck ’round long enough to reap what I had sewn.

The nature and manner of the type of travel in which I was engaged (long-term, multiple-country, terrestrial, low budget, low carbon) was such that no sooner had I settled down and begun to develop feelings for a place, than it was time to move on.

And on…

And on…

And on.

By threading one WWOOF to the next I finally made my way overland from England to Australia, via twenty-one countries. The entire journey took seventeen months to complete and is remembered as a series of falling in love with places, and then having to leave – learning gradually, and with distance, to let them go.

The good news, I discovered, is that as a species we’re admirably well-adapted to love broadly and widely, deeply and long. The understanding that I have cultivated over the course of my hybrid travel-gardening adventures is that humans are polyamorous in terms of their relationship to place: that they can belong to many places (and cultures) at once.

Mine and Richie’s beloved first-ever kitchen garden at The Patch, England

As I write, it occurs to me that one of the reasons I regard travelling and gardening as incongruous (and I admit, I haven’t decided outright that this is truly the case) is that gardening is something you do at home. Traveling, on the other hand is a practice you practice ‘away’ from home. Insofar as practices go, gardening and travelling share the characteristic of being place-specific. It just so happens that the places in which they occur are thoroughly incompatible, even opposite: home & away respectively. Continue reading

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Filed under Culture, Doctoral Research, Earth Care, Food, Literature, Permaculture, Philosophy, Travel, Writing

Successful Confirmation

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45 days after giving my Confirmation Presentation

I can say with certainty that I am officially…

CONFIRMED!

I received the confirmation outcome advice from the Office of Research two days ago.

Here’s what the email said:


Dear Nina

I am pleased to advise that the Chair of the Research Degrees Committee has approved the faculty’s recommendation to approve your progression to confirmed candidature in the Doctor of Creative Arts program at the University of the Sunshine Coast. Your revised Research Plan has also been approved and your thesis title updated as indicated:

Seed: cultivating permaculture-travel memoir through applied permaculture design      


Attached to the email was a copy of the examiner’s report.  Continue reading

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Filed under Doctoral Research, Permaculture, Travel, Writing

Invitation – Join me for my confirmation presentation!

If you’re in the Sunshine Coast area (Queensland, Australia) I invite you to attend my confirmation presentation where I will be exploring the doctoral research I’ve undertaken to date and the anticipated future directions of the research leading to submission for examination within the next year or two.

Details of the seminar are:

Title: Seed: cultivating permaculture-travel memoir through applied permaculture design.

Presenter: Nina Gartrell, DCA Candidate

When: Friday 10th April 2015 between 10am-10.30am

Where: KG.07 Business Conference Room, Sippy Downs campus, University of the Sunshine Coast

Staff, students, graduates and members of the public are welcome to attend.

Abstract
My research endeavours to productively fuse permaculture and travel memoir to create new understandings of sustainability. The project grew organically out of the rich lived-experiences I accumulated during an extended period of wanderlust and experimentation in sustainable living practices. It marries my recent experience as a permaculture practitioner with my ongoing passion for travel and writing.

The concept for the research is to apply the principles of permaculture design to the analysis, contextualisation and creation of an innovative form of travel memoir. The aim is to generate a prototype of permaculture-travel memoir and a blueprint of how permaculture can be used and adapted as the basis of an ecologically informed creative writing praxis.

The creative artefact, entitled Seed: the Art and Mystery of Permatravel, is a permaculture-travel memoir inspired by a flightless journey from England to Australia that I undertook in 2012-2013. The journey was conceived as an experiment in permaculture-designed (ethical) travel and will be portrayed in the creative artefact as a personal quest to locate and learn from individuals and communities who embody the ideal of ‘permanent culture‘ and who practice ‘permanent agriculture‘. From forest gardening in the UK, to rammed earth construction in the Middle Atlas Mountains and from synergistic gardening in Tuscany to biological pest control on the island of Koh Phangan the creative artefact explores the diverse techniques individuals use to meet their needs for food, energy, water and shelter sustainably from their local environment. The research draws on key concepts and critical discourses in ecocriticism, environmental anthropology, environmental philosophy, sociology of tourism and applied permaculture design.

Bio
In 2007 I resigned from a position as a research assistant at a reputable Australian university to travel to India. Within two months of leaving Australia I met my lifelong partner and ‘discovered’ permaculture. I spent the following six years abroad: gaining accreditation as a permaculture designer; planting a food forest; building a turf-roof barn; traveling extensively; and working in London as a freelance journalist. In 2013 I returned to my home on the Sunshine Coast where I am currently putting down roots and cultivating a garden: a space in which to grow the many seeds (literal and figurative) I collected over the course of my travels. The biggest seed I am tending is my doctoral research on ‘permatravel’ and ‘permaculture-travel memoir’. I have a Bachelor of Communications (Literary Studies; Film and Media Studies) and a BA(Hons) awarded from Griffith University. I received the University Medal for my Honours dissertation.

Here’s me in the role of ‘perm-traveller’ (I’ll try and look a little more presentable on friday… hope to see you there!

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Filed under Doctoral Research, Earth Care, Permaculture, Social Justice, Travel, Writing

Permaculture Traveller launched!

Dear friends,

Welcome back to typo traveller! After a twelve-month hiatus I’ve returned. Time to set in motion a new phase of life and along with it, a new phase in the life of this blog.

As you might already have noticed typo traveller has undergone a name-change. From here on in I’ll be conversing through the mouthpiece of Permaculture Traveller.

Why the name-change?

Because life changes. I’ve changed. You’ve changed. We all change. Same same but different.

In terms of the ‘old’ name…

I’m still ‘typing’ – typing harder than I’ve ever typed before.

I’m still prone to ‘typos’ (there’ll be ample evidence of this in this post, as well as future posts)

And (this part is a bit more of a stretch of the imagination)… I’m still travelling.

Okay. I’m not. But I am. Bear with me while I explain…

Typo Traveller was inaugurated as a travel blog. A blog to travel with. It accompanied me on an epic journey overland (no flying!) from England to Morocco, and from Morocco to Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania, Georgia (…okay, I’m gloating…), Russian, Kazakhstan, China, Laos, Cambodia and Thailand (…still gloating…), Malaysia, Indonesia, Timor-Leste, and eventually ‘home’, to Australia.

Then… well, the buck stopped there.

For a time.

18 months later I am no longer travelling. I am the co-keeper and cultivator of a home and garden in the Obi Obi, Queensland, Australia.

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And, I’m a scholar!

Remember how I fled Australia for India in 2007 to avoid doing a PhD?

Well, you can only flee destiny for so long. In my case, six years.

After a prolonged period of waywardness I’ve re-joined the academy. I’m an unconfirmed Doctor of Creative Arts (Creative Writing) candidate with the Faculty of Arts and Business and the Sustainability Research Centre at the University of the Sunshine Coast.

So far I’ve completed one year out of a three-year full-time program of doctoral research.

The concept for my doctoral research is to write a permaculture-travel memoir about the flightless journey that my partner and I undertook in 2012-2013. The creative artefact will be called Seed: The Art and Mystery of Permatravel.

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Part of the joy of conducting the research is that it allows me to continue travelling. In my mind.

Every day, my imagination sallies forth from its situated, embodied habitus within my body (which I leave behind, for practical reasons, in my writing studio), and returns to the places that I visited over the course of my journey.

For me, writing the memoir is an opportunity to imaginatively re-inhabit the places I visited during that journey – and reconnect, (yes… still imaginatively), with the remarkable people whom I met – the many WWOOF, Couch Surfing, WorkX and AirBnB hosts – and the diverse landscapes I inhabited with them: fincas, farms, cottages, islands, mountains, gorges, cities…

I want to learn more about those people and places, supplementing my experiential knowledge with book learning on cultural history, natural history, political history, folk lore, environmental anthropology and ethnoecology.

The narrative I will be writing is not only about the art and mystery of permatravel, it is about how people meet their needs ‘for food, energy, shelter, and other material and non-material needs in a sustainable way’, and how gradually, over time, people integrate harmoniously with their landscape.

Here’s where permaculture comes in.

The definition of permaculture outlined by Bill Mollison (2012, pp. ix-x) in Permaculture: A Designers’ Handbook is as follows:


 

Permaculture (permanent agriculture) is the conscious design and maintenance of agriculturally productive ecosystems which have the diversity, stability, and resilience of natural ecosystems. It is the harmonious integration of landscape and people providing their food, energy, shelter, and other material and non-material needs in a sustainable way…
                       The philosophy of permaculture is one of working with, rather than against, nature; of protracted and thoughtful observation rather than protracted and thoughtless action; of looking at systems in all their functions, rather than asking only one yield of them; and of allowing systems to demonstrate their own evolutions.


The innovation of my research is that I’ll be applying permaculture design to the process of researching and writing a permaculture-travel memoir.

What I am attempting to do is develop a blueprint of an integrated permaculture-writing practice: to develop a form, and a process, that works with, and responds creatively to the twelve principles of permaculture design and which exemplifies the permaculture ethic: ‘earth care, people care, fair share’.

The twelve principles are:

Observe and Interact
Catch and Store Energy
Obtain a Yield
Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback
Use and Value Renewable Resources and Services
Produce no Waste
Design from Pattern to Details
Integrate, Rather than Segregate
Use Small and Slow Solutions
Use and Value Diversity
Use Edges and Value the Marginal
Creatively Use and Respond to Change

You’ve heard of people ‘doing’ permaculture on landscapes? Well, I’m ‘doing’ permaculture on a creative arts product – a memoir.

How is it going to turn out?

I’ve no idea.

But if you’re keen to find out, come along with me for the ride. Deviations welcome. Road-blocks expected. Delays inevitable. Arrival… a far-off but enchanting possibility.

 

NOTE: If you’re working on a similar project, or if you’re somehow engaged in the practices of writing, permaculture or travel, leave a comment and let me know what you’re up to. This blog is all about observing and interacting with what’s going on around me, and learning (graciously) to ‘apply self-regulation and accept feedback’ (the 4th principle of permaculture design). See you on the road…

 

 

 

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Filed under Culture, Doctoral Research, Earth Care, Permaculture, Travel, Uncategorized, Writing