Tag Archives: jackfruit

On a mission in Phuket… in photos

cruising the beaches, yacht clubs, marinas and piers in search of a ride south...

cruising the beaches, yacht clubs and marinas in search of a crewing opportunity south…

that one would do...

that one would do…

... or that

… or that

checking out the competition at the Boat Lagoon Marina

checking out the competition at the Boat Lagoon Marina

spot the cheeky mugs! Putting ourselves out there...

spot the cheeky mugs! Putting ourselves out there…

Crew for you!

Crew for you!

It's not all hard work... strolling in old town Phuket

It’s not all hard work… strolling in old town Phuket

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local cats on the look-out

local cats on the look-out

high glamour in one of Phuket's more picturesque lane ways

high glamour in one of Phuket’s more picturesque lane ways

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a golden horizon of fishcakes

a golden horizon of fishcakes

power (present) & Portugal (past)

power (present) & Portugal (past)

another crumbling facade

another crumbling facade

Richie ogles the jackfruits in the market... eyes as big as saucers

Richie ogles the jackfruits in the market… eyes as big as saucers

dusk... and still 60% humidity

dusk… and still 60% humidity

a late night in the lobby finding WorkX, Wwofi, Couch Surfing and music opportunities

a late night in the lobby finding WorkX, Wwoof, Couch Surfing and music opportunities

Crew for you...

Crew for you…

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Filed under Food, History, Permaculture, Travel

Bangkok Cheap Eats

plates don't stay full for long in Bangkok!

plates don’t stay full for long in Bangkok!

As travellers, Richie and I are devoted to cheap eats. Eat cheap, eat local! In Bangkok, where food is fresh, bountiful, varied and tasty, it’s hardly a difficult motto to live by. Nor does it require a spirit of self-sacrifice. By eating the food that locals eat, where locals eat it, we’ve saved ourselves loads of money and disappointment.

On average, Richie and I get by in Thailand on about 200Baht ($6.50) p/person p/day for food: that’s three light meals a day, one or two cold beverages, a sweet treat AND some fresh fruit.

So, dive into the closest alley, market and cafeteria with us and kick up your culinary heels as we take you into the world of Bangkok eats and drinks for under $2.

Eating cheap with the Lonely Planet 

If you’re feeling dubious about eating local or trying something new, the Lonely Planet (or other trusted guide book) is a good place to start. In general, we find their suggestions useful and reliable. In Bangkok we put the Planet to the test by eating out at two of the restaurants/stalls recommended in the 2012 14th edition. Here’s what we reckon:

  • Khrua Phornlamai; Th Plaeng Nam (Chinatown) for pàt kêe mow (wide rice noodles fried with seafood, chillies and Thai basil). Cost: 60B/$1.90.
pàt kêe mow (wide rice noodles fried with seafood, chillies and Thai basil)

pàt kêe mow (wide rice noodles fried with seafood, chillies and Thai basil)

The lowdown: This Chinatown street stall consists of little more than a few woks, a trestle table covered with bowls of fresh ingredients and a handful of plastic tables and chairs.

The pàt kêe mow arrived quickly on sizzling plates. Despite our request that the dishes be prepared ‘Thai hot’ they arrived with only a hint of fire. In order to achieve the required heat factor, we added fresh and dried chilli from the pots on the table, which included the ubiquitous fish sauce, sugar and vinegar.

There was a good amount of seafood in the dish, mostly prawns and squid. The wide rice noodles were not as chewy as perhaps they could have been. The dish was a bit flaccid and lacked the clarity of flavour I’ve come to expect in Thailand. Still, it was an enjoyable and filling meal, the basil was yummy and the location ideal. A perfect place to to sit and soak up the bustling atmosphere of Chinatow. Experience: 3/5 (In Richie’s opinion: 4/5).

blow! It's hot!

blow! It’s hot!

  • Thip Samai; 313 Th Mahachai; 5:30pm-1:30am closed alternate wednesdays, for pat tai (fried rice noodles with egg, shrimp and peanuts). Cost: 70Baht/$2.20.
pat tai perfection

pat tai perfection

Okay, we broke the budget on this one. But it was worth it! When we arrived at Thip Samai at 5:20pm after a hot greasy stroll from Wat Pho, the queue was out the door and down the road. The theatrics in the outdoors kitchen made the time pass quickly: 12 busy staff with woks rocking, flames jumping and food flying. In no time at all we were sitting inside eating. The place was spotlessly clean and the wait staff friendly and polite.

wok 'n' roll, the busy kitchen at Thip Samai

wok ‘n’ roll, the busy kitchen at Thip Samai

Out of the 3 dishes on offer we opted for the pat tai served in a crepe-thin layer of omlette.

The experience took my appreciation of pat tai to a whole new level. Each thread of noodle was separate, al dente and elegantly coated in flavour. We were liberal with the chopped peanuts, basil, bean sprouts, fresh chilli and lime (delivered fresh to your table when you order). No messing about!

Every mouthful a pleasure: the crisp crunch of the raw sprouts, the silky wholesomeness of the omelette, the pungency of the spring onion and the nuttiness of the roasted peanut. A full and memorable taste experience. Two days later, we were back for more! Experience: 5/5.

Our recommendations

 You won’t find the following options in ‘the book’ but we found them ourselves and reckon they’re just as worthy of inclusion.

  • Moo satay (pork satay skewers with peanut sauce) at Nothaburi Market. Cost: 40B/$1.30
moo satay on our very own plastic plate

moo satay on our very own plastic plate

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Filed under Culture, Earth Care, Food, Travel

Stealing Jackfruit in Luang Prabang

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If there’s one crime that suits my disposition better than others it’s stealing fruit. In England, harvesting fruit without permission is a sport fondly referred to as ‘scrumping’. It’s a right of passage. No stigma attached. Even the prime minister would be forgiven fruit-stealing proclivities so long as he atoned by lowering the tax on apple cider.

Here on the banks of the Mekong, in a country twice removed from the grassy orchards of Somerset, there’s every chance that scrumping is an offence punishable by more than just a slap on the wrists.

The fruit that has got me wondering whether it’s ever right to steal, is none other than the king of fruits, the mighty mighty jackfruit: big as an Ox and knobblier than granny’s crochet blankets. This one’s a beauty: the fruit is roughly wombat-size, irregular, oblong, kissed with black at its extremities, and anchored to the trunk by a stem as thick and sinuous as an umbilical chord. The tree has delivered one hell of a baby!

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Thai jackfruit for sale in the market in Jinghong, China

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Filed under Architecture & Design, Culture, Food, Travel